HCPLive Network
PERSONAL FINANCE

5 Nasty Retirement Shocks

Laura Joszt | Wednesday, April 10, 2013
Life is nothing if not full of uncertainty, it’s the reason why we have insurance and (should have) emergency funds set aside. After all, surprises can be expensive, whether it’s a car accident or a sudden medical issue or legal trouble.
 
Constantly, one of the biggest fears people have regarding retirement is that they don’t have enough money. They could outlive their savings; they could become sicker than anticipated; they could have miscalculated some factor or forgot entirely to consider one.
 
Just because you’ve reached retirement age, doesn’t mean that you no longer need an emergency fund. Social Security and your IRA aren’t necessarily enough. This emergency fund needs to be separate from your retirement plan and savings so that any sudden shocks you face won’t hurt your retirement.
 
Here are the five nastiest retirement surprises, according to USA Today.
 


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