Ann Romney Releases Memoir Detailing Battle with Multiple Sclerosis

Ann Romney, wife of 2012 Republican Presidential Nominee Mitt Romney, released her memoir discussing her marriage, her diagnosis with multiple sclerosis (MS), her faith, and other inspirational stories of overcoming adversity

Ann Romney, wife of 2012 Republican Presidential Nominee Mitt Romney, released her memoir on September 29, 2015, titled In this Together: My Story. The publication details her marriage, her diagnosis with multiple sclerosis (MS), her faith, and other inspirational stories of overcoming adversity.

Ann Romney was diagnosed with MS in 1998 and was originally told by doctors there was nothing they were able to do for it. She is currently in remission from Stage Zero breast cancer, for which she was also treated.

“A lot of people talk about a transformation that happens when life throws you a curve ball, and the big one in my life was my MS diagnosis,” Romney explained. “With all the blessings I’ve had, MS has been my greatest teacher: it has taught me about faith, compassion, and serving others. I’ve met many people along the way who’ve shared advice and demonstrated enormous resilience in the face of challenges; their stories gave me strength. In sharing my story, I want to give others hope as I’ve been given hope on this journey.”

Proceeds of the book will benefit the Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Mass., which was launched in October 2014. In an appearance on the

Today show promoting the book, Ann also provided an update on the latest research being conducted at the facility.

“In the lab now, we’re working on a nasal vaccine for Alzheimer’s,” she told NBC’s Kathie Lee and Hoda Kotb. In another interview, Romney said there are 250 scientists and researchers at the Center.

“The doctors that are working on this will say in our lifetime, we will have a nasal vaccine that will be as effective as the polio vaccine. There’s exciting things coming.”

Romney added that she sees this opportunity as her chance to be strong for those who are suffering and waiting for a cure. Originally, when she was diagnosed, she was told there was nothing that could be done. However, between her book and the Center, she believes she can accelerate and promote cures and treatment.

One struggle in writing the book, Romney said, was re-entering the “dark, scary place” that she was in at her diagnosis. She said she experienced depression, overwhelming fatigue, and feelings of hopelessness and that life was over.

She was able to get medication to slow the progression of MS, but said she still felt lousy. Then, she pieced together a regimen of alternative medicine to stay active and energized, including riding horses, acupuncture, and reflexology.