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CDC Publishes Vaccination Coverage Stats

Vaccination coverage among US children ages 19 to 35 months in 2013 increased relative to 2012 data from the National Immunization Survey for some vaccines (rotavirus, Hep B birth dose, and ≥ 1HepA dose).

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), vaccination coverage among US children ages 19 to 35 months in 2013 increased relative to 2012 data from the National Immunization Survey (NIS) for some vaccines (rotavirus, Hep B birth dose, and ≥ 1HepA dose) and remained stable for others. Less than 1% of children had not received any vaccinations.

National Healthy People 2020 targets were met in 2013 for 4 vaccines: ≥1 MMR, ≥3 Hep B, ≥3 poliovirus, and ≥1 varicella doses. Four other vaccines were within 8 percentage points of their targets (≥4 DTaP doses, full series of Hib, ≥4 PCV doses, and rotavirus), but coverage increased from 2012 to 2013 only for rotavirus vaccination, the CDC said. Disparities in coverage by poverty level were larger for these 4 vaccines compared with vaccines that met their Healthy People 2020 targets.

In 2012 and 2013 coverage for DTaP, PCV, and the full Hib series remained at similar levels (81% to 83%). The CDC believes that because these vaccines require a booster dose during the second year of life, when opportunities for catch-up doses are fewer because of the declining frequency of well-child visits, clinician and system-based interventions are needed to increase opportunities for vaccination, including use of immunization information systems, clinician assessment and feedback, clinician reminders, and standing orders.

DTaP, PCV, and Hib coverage were 8 to 12 percentage points lower for children living below the poverty level compared with children living at or above the poverty level. Children below the poverty level also had rotavirus coverage at least 13 percentage points lower than that of children living at or above the poverty level.

One child in 12 is not getting his or her first dose of MMR vaccine on time, underscoring considerable measles susceptibility across the country, said the CDC, and MMR vaccination coverage continues to vary from state to state.

For more information, see the CDC’s August 29, 2014, issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.