ICYMI: The 10 Best Health Stories from July

The MD Magazine editors rounded up the 10 best stories from July – did you read them all?

Summer is officially halfway over and so far it has been an eventful one!

Between news targeting trendy health “treatments”, the 2016 Olympic Games, and health risks based on hair color, there were many intriguing reports this month. But if you missed any of them, don’t worry — the editors at MD Magazine rounded up the best stories from July!

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A lawsuit has been filed against the owners of a McDonald’s restaurant in Arkansas for allegedly firing a male employee because he has the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

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Will the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro lead to global spread of Zika? Some health officials have voiced dire warnings to that effect.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has assessed the risk and concluded it is minimal.

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While looking to find new ways to treat patients with pain beyond opioids, a considerable amount of research has been done looking at alternative medications without the addiction risk.

David R. Walega, MD, from Northwestern Medicine in Chicago, discusses the other therapy techniques that come without potential addiction.

>>> Watch the exclusive interview.

Routine skincare is especially important when basking in the summertime sunshine.

While sunscreen products can be an easy fix, people often buy the cheapest, best smelling, or cult favorites — and not the ones that actually measure up to the recommended standards of the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD).

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You may have seen reports on the “treatment” on TV or heard that some of Beverley Hills’ richest citizens are raving about it, but whole body cryotherapy (WBC) doesn’t yet have the data to back up the many health benefits claimed by its boosters.

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Two Texas physicians who followed law enforcement’s orders to forcibly perform cavity searchers of a woman suspected for carrying drugs were named in an out-of-court settlement in which the woman received $475,000 for her humiliating treatment. She was found not to be concealing drugs.

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Health experts have persistently scrutinized the negative impact dietary fats have on cardiovascular disease and other medication conditions. Recently, however, researchers have shed a positive light on certain types of dietary fats — specifically the health benefits of consuming more unsaturated fat.

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People with red hair, pale skin, and freckles have long been advised to take extra precautions when out in the sun. New research has supported these concerns by proving the MC1R gene variant associated with red hair was directly linked to a higher number of genetic mutations in skin cancers.

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Now that most forms of hepatitis C are treatable, if not curable, other conditions like fatty liver disease are drawing a lot of attention in the field of hepatology.

David Bernstein, MD, from Northwell Health, talks about potential risk factors that stop patients from getting treatment.

>>> Watch the exclusive interview.

More than eight million emergency department visits each year in the United States are due to nontraumatic chest pain — making it the second most common reason patients present to the emergency room. But a new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine found that these situations are rarely serious.

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