Incidence of the Deadliest Skin Cancer on the Rise

A report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that melanoma incidence rates in the US have doubled throughout the last three decades.

A report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that melanoma incidence rates in the US have doubled throughout the last three decades.

According to the report, the rate of melanoma will presumably rise steadily over the next 15 years provided “no additional skin cancer prevention efforts are made at a community level”.

By 2030, 112,000 new cases of melanoma will be diagnosed each year.

Analyzing melanoma incidence and mortality data from 2011, the researchers found reports of 65,647 cases of invasive melanoma and 9,128 melanoma-induced deaths.

The data highlighted the fact that melanoma deaths have remained stable since 1982 — the death rate remained at approximately 2.7 per 100,000 in 2011.

Lisa Richardson, director of Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, CDC, commented, “the rate of people getting melanoma continues to increase every year compared to the rates of most other cancers.”

Richardson continued, “If we take action now, we can prevent hundreds of thousands of new cases of skin cancers, including melanoma, and save billions of dollars in medical costs.”

Rigorously searching for skin cancer interventions now could potentially curb the exponentially increasing treatment costs. The report found the cost of melanoma treatment “would rise by 252.4%, from $457 million to 2011 to $1.6 billion in 2030”.

The CDC understands the necessity for manageable action, like working to diminish UV exposure and increase sun protection. To successfully implement action, the CDC hopes to marshal community-wide education programs focusing on educating the public of the perils of UV exposure.