Military Medicine Adapts to Changing Armed Forces Landscape

Video

From its earliest days the armed forces has had soldiers who have been assigned to help treat their comrades in arms. In the 21st century that role has changed along with the rest of the military while working through the war on terror on multiple fronts.

From its earliest days the armed forces has had soldiers who have been assigned to help treat their comrades in arms. In the 21st century that role has changed along with the rest of the military while working through the war on terror on multiple fronts.

Colonel Andrew Cole, Commanding Officer of the 87th Medical Group at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst said that while parts of the job of a military doctor have changed, the basic core of the role will remain the same as long as there are men and women on the battlefield.

New Jersey's Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst serves not only service members from the Army, Air Force, Navy, Marines, and Coast Guard but also veterans of those branches who served their country in the past. As a result they work to provide the same high level of care to everyone through the 87th Medical Group.

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