MS Radio Launched by MSology

The launch of MS Radio aims to spread information, host discussions, and present features for multiple sclerosis patients, caregivers, and clinicians.

Canadian research information source MSology has launched MS Radio, a resource for multiple sclerosis (MS) features, news, and information. The launch is to celebrate the organization’s second anniversary.

The first episode, which can be heard here, is a roundtable discussion about dealing with MS on a daily basis. The conversation is moderated by Steven Manners, the editor of MSology. The 4 nurses featured are: Bonnie Blain, RN, MSCN, Central Alberta MS Clinic, Red Deer, Alberta; Peggy Cook, MS Clinic, Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John, New Brunswick; Trudy Campbell, MN NP, Dalhousie MS Clinic, Halifax, Nova Scotia; Josée Poirier, RN, BSc, MSCN, MS Clinic, Hôpital Notre-Dame, Montreal, Quebec.

Part 1 of the inaugural broadcast features a discussion of information about MS and pregnancy and breast feeding. The nurses talk about lifestyle factors that can help and hurt MS in the second part. The third part, depression, anxiety, and recreation/leisure time are discussed in relation to MS.

“Our goal is to provide people affected by MS with timely and accurate information,” Manners said in a press release. “Our hope is that MS Radio will help people access the news more easily. They may have vision problems that make the website difficult to read. Or they want something that they can download and listen to when they’re in the car or out for a walk.”

The launch of the radio station was chosen purposefully to coincide with the 2014 Joint ACTRIMS/ECTRIMS Meeting, which took place September 10-13, 2014 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Find HCPLive’s video and article coverage of the conference here.) The meeting aimed to cover “a premiere program covering a wide range of tracks and presentation topics including genetics, pathogenesis, factors that determine MS susceptibility and treatment strategies, to study outcomes and research advances, to the latest in regeneration and rehabilitation.” The multitude of new research presented and highlighted there would be a great jumping off point for the discussions.

“The number of pieces of new research — over a thousand this year – can be overwhelming,” Manners continued. “But one of the best things about these meetings is for people to talk with their colleagues about what they’ve seen. We thought it would be interesting to enable people to listen in on these conversations. And MS nurses are experts at taking information and turning it into practical advice for people living with MS.”

The weekly service caters to over 100 countries and dispenses information about the latest research news, living with MS, and offers advice for when facing decisions.