PAS News

May 7, 2009

The Pediatric Academic Societies wrapped up the annual meeting in Baltimore on Cinco de Mayo.

Apparently, schools are opening back up after the initial scare associated with swine flu cases cropping up in the US. Parents finally get a break from sitting at home and watching for symptoms in their children, although I’m sure the kids would like the holiday to last a bit longer.

The Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) wrapped up the annual meeting in Baltimore on Cinco de Mayo. Unfortunately for those of us who didn’t get to attend, the abstracts are password protected, with the exception of those associated with late-breaker presentations. I found a press release on some reasons parents skip vaccinations that was interesting, especially having been recently notified about a pertussis outbreak at my daughter’s school.

Another interesting study presented at PAS had to do with maternal iron deficiency and delayed auditory neural maturation of premature infants. I’m attempting to get more detailed information than what is included in the press release, and will update the blog later if it becomes available.

Maybe it’s just me, but I’m finding it humorous that gaming systems are not only an increasing part of pediatric treatment and health/fitness, but also a convenience for physicians. Gotta love the Wii. By the way, for all the hoopla surrounding Pedisedate (http://gizmodo.com/5212998/pedisedate-the-only-game-boy-accessory-designed-to-drug-children; www.switched.com/2009/04/16/pedisedate-combines-video-games-and-going-under; http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-10223559-1.html; http://medgadget.com/archives/2009/04/pedisedate_helps_with_sedation_may_create_new_cultural_phenomenon.html), I can’t find any indication via press releases or the FDA website that the product is even being sold. I mean, it’s definitely a novel idea, but the design was well publicized in 2002. What’s the real news?

Wow, this will have some people up in arms. When it comes to the safest setting for birth (ie, hospital vs. home), most of us intuitively go for the hospital, even when we choose to use a midwife or forego anesthetic support. However, there are a number of midwives and organizations that advocate for homebirth as a preferable—and safe—choice. I like choice, but can’t image a mindset where a birth must take place devoid of quick access to emergency medical treatment.