Q&A With Luca Cicalese From University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston: Scaffold Development Could Help Patients with Intestinal Issues

For patients who might need an intestinal transplant the surgery can often be a difficult and not always a permanent process. A new area of research is looking at whether cells can form intestines in the patients without needing the full transplant process.

For patients who might need an intestinal transplant the surgery can often be a difficult and not always a permanent process. A new area of research is looking at whether cells can form intestines in the patients without needing the full transplant process.

Luca Cicalese, MD, from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston said that early tests in rats have shown potential for the scaffold model to work in humans as well. While other studies have been done on the topic Cicalese said the model from his team has shown the new intestine absorbing the vitamins needed to maintain a high quality of life. The results of the study were discussed at Digestive Disease Week 2015 in Washington DC.