Study Releases Results on Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions

A study on the patterns of substance use treatment admissions between the years 1998 to 2008 has illustrated some marked changes.

The study by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration demonstrated a steady rise in the proportion of treatment admissions attributed to drug abuse alone. In 1998, 26% of these treatment admissions were attributed to drug abuse and in 2008 it was up to 37%. The proportion of admissions attributed to alcohol alone fell from 27% to 23% through this time period.

Additionally, the study shows that although the concurrent abuse of both alcohol and drugs has remained widespread, the proportion of treatment admissions for the co-abuse of these substances has declined gradually yet significantly during this period — from 44% to 38%.

The study was conducted as part of the SAMSHA Data and Outcome Initiative to create a data system that would provide public health information on behavioral health issues.

Other findings from the study include:

- A rise in opiate admissions from 16% to 20% in 2008.

- A decline in cocaine admissions from 15% in 1998 to 11% in 2008.

- An increase in marijuana admissions from 13% in 1998 to 17% in 2008

- A rise in stimulant admissions from 4% in 1998 to 6% in 2008.

"This survey provides valuable insight into the changing nature and source of substance abuse treatment admissions," said SAMHSA Administrator, Pamela S. Hyde, JD, in a press release. "It can guide us in developing more effective treatment programs and better approaches within healthcare systems for identifying and engaging those who may need help for substance abuse disorders - help that if given in time can make a critical difference in a person's recovery."

A study on the patterns of substance use treatment admissions between the years 1998 to 2008 has illustrated some marked changes.