February 2015

Cardiac Biomarker Testing Overused in Emergency Departments

March 05, 2015

Pain Management

Cardiac biomarker testing is often used in emergency department visits even when there is no suspected symptom of acute coronary syndrome, according to research from UT Southwestern Medical Center.

STI Risk Not Related to HPV Vaccination in Females

March 05, 2015

Infectious Disease

Rates of sexually transmitted infections were unrelated to human papillomavirus vaccination in females aged 12 to 18 years old, according to research published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

ALS or BLS: Questioning What We Thought Was Obvious

March 05, 2015

Cardiology

Cardiac arrests often occur at home. The American Heart Association estimated that roughly one million Americans suffer heart attacks annually; 88% occur at home, and patients have a 50-50 chance of reaching the hospital alive.

Kids, Cholesterol and Blood Pressure: Tracking Change

March 05, 2015

Cardiology

The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) has tracked changes in dyslipidemia and blood pressure in children since 1988. A new report in JAMA Pediatrics indicated that serum lipid concentrations improved in American children and adolescents since 1988.

Conditional Disease-free Survival after GIST Resection Improves Over Time

March 06, 2015

Gastroenterology

A recent JAMA Surgery study by Danielle A. Bischof, MD, of Johns Hopkins University and her American and Canadian colleagues was the first to estimate conditional disease-free survival (CDFS) for primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) following complete surgical resection.

Screening and Surveillance for Barrett's Esophagus: The Controversy Continues

March 06, 2015

Gastroenterology

Although the prevalence of Barrett's esophagus is considered moderate, the condition is the only established precursor of esophageal adenocarcinoma, and thus it has become the focus of programs of endoscopic screening and surveillance.

Gastric Bypass and the Super Obese

March 07, 2015

Gastroenterology

When obese patients who want bariatric procedures have a body mass index (BMI) of 50 to 60, surgeons must decide which technique is best. These patients are challenging. About 25% of US patients with obesity are in this group.

Measles Vaccinations: Tell, Don't Ask

March 06, 2015

Infectious Disease

Pediatricians and primary care doctors often face a quandary when it comes to routine vaccinations for children. When talking to parents about vaccination, the best approach may be speaking to parents as though it is assumed the vaccinations will be done, rather than opening the door to parental choice.

Maintenance of Certification: Adequate or Not?

April 07, 2015

Quick Consult

This discussion is with David Lazarus, MD, the chairman of medicine at Princeton University Medical, Plainsboro, NJ. We are deliberating the maintenance of certification (MOC) requirements for internal medicine.

Treating the Penicillin-allergic Patient

April 14, 2015

Clinical Pearl

A frequent challenge when prescribing antibiotics is what to prescribe for the patient who states they are allergic to penicillin. This is particularly true when prescribing cephalosporins. The frequently quoted rate of cross-sensitivity between penicillin and cephalosporins is between 5 and 10 percent.

The Parable of the Salt and the Evolving Medical Consensus

May 21, 2015

Cover Story

Changes in the way we think about sodium intake and cardiovascular risk, calcium supplementation, and other topics should remind us all of the advice we heard on the first day of medical school: 50% of what you learn here is wrong or going to disappear over your career; we just don't know which 50%.