Central Line Infections Still a Low Priority in Hospitals

Article

Few hospitals are implementing initiatives to reduce central line-associated bloodstream infections, despite the fact that monitoring and prevention programs have produced favorable outcomes.

Few hospitals are implementing initiatives to reduce central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs), despite the fact that monitoring and prevention programs have produced favorable outcomes.

In a study published in the American Journal of Medical Quality, David J. Murphy, MD, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and colleagues surveyed state hospital associations regarding their efforts to address these infections. All 50 of the responding associations stated that they realize the importance of improving patient safety, care quality, and healthcare-associated infections, and 42% of associations cited CLABSIs as a priority; however, just 11% were able to provide statewide CLABSI rates. According to the researchers, CLABSI programs were active in six (12%) states, and an additional seven (14%) states were planning programs.

Barriers that were identified included a lack of coordinated priorities, limited infrastructure, and inadequate resources.

“Although associations support efforts to improve healthcare quality, including CLABSI prevention, most lack coordinated statewide monitoring and prevention programs,” said researchers. “A national collaborative to address CLABSIs may reduce these infections while building capacity to improve other aspects of healthcare quality.”

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