Community Resources and Participation

October 21, 2009
Chris Cole

During this hour-and-one-half concurrent abstract session, moderated by Jennifer M. Hootman, PhD, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atalanta, GA, a half-dozen abstracts were presented, focusing on health-related quality of life among adults with arthritis, the impact of arthritis and other chronic conditions on community participation, quality of non-pharmacologic care for patients with osteoarthritis, social network support, and restrictions in participating in life situations among patients with RA.

During this hour-and-one-half concurrent abstract session, moderated by Jennifer M. Hootman, PhD, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atalanta, GA, a half-dozen abstracts were presented, focusing on health-related quality of life among adults with arthritis, the impact of arthritis and other chronic conditions on community participation, quality of non-pharmacologic care for patients with osteoarthritis, social network support, and restrictions in participating in life situations among patients with RA.

Health-Related Quality of Life Among US Adults Aged 65+ With Arthritis Presentation Number: 2075

Researchers: Furner S, Hootman J, Helmick C, Zack M

Purpose: "To determine how demographics, social or healthcare factors, health behaviors, and health conditions are associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among persons aged 65+ years with arthritis."

Results: Over the 3 years of this study, arthritis among people age 65 years and older who lived in the 50 US states and Washington, DC, had a prevalence of 56%. Among those with arthritis, physically and mentally unhealthy days, as well as fair or poor self-rated health were reported more than among those without arthritis. Additionally, factors that are "consistently associated with poor HRQOL in persons 65+ with arthritis are modifiable." The researches found that many health benefits and positive influences on HRQOL can be recognized by increasing physical activity among this population. They also conclude that social, "health education, and public health policies targeted to this population may help reduce the HRQOL burden associated with arthritis."

Shut In? Impact of Arthritis and Other Chronic Conditions on Community Participation Among Older Adults Presentation Number: 2076

Researchers: Furner S, Theis K

Purpose: "To estimate the prevalence of participation restriction (PR) in community activities due to physical environmental barriers among older adults and to compare the impact among those with arthritis versus other chronic conditions."

Results: The most commonly reported built environment barrier overall, and for women-with the exception of those with hearing impairments who most often reported sound as a barrier-was building design. The most common walkability barrier for women with arthritis was reported to be sidewalks/curbs, with men, regardless of condition, reporting crowds as the most frequent barrier of this type. The second most prevalent condition overall among participants was arthritis (40%), representing 30 million adults age 50 years or older; however, those with arthritis reported one of the two lowest prevalence rates of any community barrier, at 6%. The researchers concluded that promising "targets for interventions to reduce community PR among adults ≥50 years with chronic conditions, particularly arthritis, are building design, sidewalks/curbs, and crowd control."

Quality of Non-pharmacological Care for People with Osteoarthritis in the CommunityPresentation Number: 2077

Researchers: Li L, Sayre E, Kopec J, et al.

Purpose: "To describe the quality of non-pharmacological care received by people with knee and/or hip osteoarthritis (OA) in the community and to assess the associated factors."

Results: "Quality of non-pharmacological care for people with knee/hip OA in the community is suboptimal. Further, inequity may exist in providing advice on exercise and weight management. Given the evidence supporting the use of these interventions to improve OA symptoms and function, and the potential to reduce the progression of joint damage, investment in future research to enhance the provision of OA care is warranted."

The Effect of Adherence Support from Social Network Members on Depression and Patient Medical AdherencePresentation Number: 2079

Researchers: Carpenter D, DeVellis R, Jordan J

Purpose: To "determine whether adherence support from vasculitis patients' physicians, partners/spouses, other family members, and other vasculitis patients influences depressive symptoms and medication adherence," as relatively "little is known about how different sources of support affect depression and medication adherence in rheumatic populations."

Results: Carpenter and colleagues determined that a protective factor against depressive symptoms can be seen with adherence support provided by physicians and patients' partners. Also, a positive affect can be seen on patient medication adherence with support from partners and family members.

Perceived Restrictions in Participation in Life Situations Among Patients with Rheumatoid ArthritisPresentation Number: 2080

Researchers: Taal E, Hagens P, Braakman-Jansen L, Van der Laar M

Purpose: To "examine the impact of RA on the patient's perceived participation in life situations and analyse associations between impairments, activity limitations, coping styles (a contextual factor) and participation restrictions within the framework of the" International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Results: Compared to patients without rheumatoid arthritis, those with the condition experienced more participation restrictions, with fatigue seen as an important "independent predictor of participation restrictions next to pain and disease activity" and activity limitations thought to "act as a pathway to explain the association between impairments and participation in life situations." The research team also found coping styles to be independent predictors of participation.