New Diabetes Resource Center Stresses Patient Education at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore

December 3, 2009

Education focuses on a range of topics including disease process, nutritional management, and psychological adjustments to preventing diabetic complications, detecting changes, monitoring levels and participating in physical activities.

Sinai Hospital of Baltimore takes an innovative approach to help people with diabetes mange their disease by opening the Diabetes Resource Center at Sinai. Participants who attend the center learn how to set and achieve successful medical and lifestyle goals with practical advice and emotional support.

"In our program, people learn how they can better handle their treatment regimen," says Sally Pinkstaff, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Diabetes Resource Center at Sinai. "Having the knowledge and skills to understand and take action against this disease are essential components to successfully living with diabetes."

Education is crucial when coping with the disease. The specialized staff at the Diabetes Resource Center at Sinai spends quality one-on-one time with each participant, discussing his or her condition and creating an individualized action plan. There are also group sessions for ongoing instruction and support.

The center's services also include real-time glucose monitoring, medication and/or insulin training, nutritional counseling, and a focus on prevention of complications. The staff includes physicians, diabetes nurse educators, pharmacists and registered dieticians.

The dedication of the staff has resulted in the American Diabetes Association (ADA) awarding the Diabetes Self-Management Program at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore its Education Recognition Certificate for quality diabetes self-management education. The status is awarded for three years.

Only programs that meet the criteria developed by the ADA and its National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Programs achieve this distinction. To receive certification, curriculums must demonstrate a consistency in the quality and quantity of comprehensive information and education offered to people with the disease.

That information and education and includes a wide range of topics including disease process, nutritional management, goal setting, problem solving and psychological adjustments to preventing diabetic complications, detecting changes, monitoring levels and participating in physical activities.

"This Recognition gives professionals a national standard by which to measure the services they provide," adds Dr. Pinkstaff. "Of course, it also assures our participants of our commitment to excellence."

Source: Sinai Hospital of Baltimore