Genetics May Control Gabapentin Response

Gabapentin is used to treat neuropathic pain from several causes, including diabetic neuropathy, post-herpetic neuralgia, and central neuropathic pain. In a study presented at the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians in Orlando, FL, April 11, Tobore Onojighofia, MD, MPH and colleagues found genetics plays a role in which patients do well on the drug.

Gabapentin is used to treat neuropathic pain from several causes, including diabetic neuropathy, post-herpetic neuralgia, and central neuropathic pain.

In a study presented at the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians in Orlando, FL, April 11, Tobore Onojighofia, MD, MPH and colleagues from Proove Biosciences and Johns Hopkins University looked at responses in 69 patients currently taking the drug across 10 clinical research sites.

The team’s objective was to determine the role genetics played in observed individual variations in response to the drug.

They used the MED scale, which rates responses on a zero-to-5 scale of efficacy, with 5 being the best score.

The researchers divided the 69 patients into 2 groups, one high scorers and one low. They eliminated those who scored in the middle.

The subjects were then genotyped using a panel of 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes encoding for proteins expressed in the mesolimbic reward pathway.

A cross tab analysis found significant association between COMT Val108/158Met and gabapentin response. Logistic regression found G/A and A/A variations to be more associated with good response to gabapentin, while G/G genotype was found to be associated with poor response.

“This study suggest that genetic variations may play a role in observed differences in response to gabapentin usage,” the team wrote.

The study also illustrates that genetics plays a role in drug response.

The work was funded by Proove Biosciences