Getting Social At Heart Rhythm 2016 with #HRS2016

May 5, 2016

This year at HRS, there has been a huge focus placed on social media and the power of communication within the digital space.

This year at HRS, there has been a huge focus placed on social media and the power of communication within the digital space.

The #HRS2016 hashtag has been well promoted in the days and weeks leading up to the annual scientific sessions, and video screens in the convention hall archive live tweets in real time throughout the course of the daily academic sessions.

While more than 80% of all Fortune 500 companies and over 420,000 C-level executives have a presence on Twitter and other social media platforms, medical professionals have been slow to adopt digital engagement.

Whether we recognize it or not, every healthcare professional already HAS a digital footprint (cyber reputation) and it is incumbent upon each of us to effectively MANAGE that footprint to maintain a positive reputation.

Several events have been created to highlight the power of digital media and promote engagement among members:

1.Nate Gross, Founder of Doximity Talks Social Media and the Digital Physician

Nate Gross, MD and founder of the physician-networking site Doximity will be presenting his vision for the digitally engaged physician on Thursday May 5th at 12:15 in the EpiCenter conference hall. Nate is a champion for physicians in social media and provides guidance for those who wish to become involved. He will relay the story of how Doximity came to be and how it has contributed to and improved physician networking.

2.Social Media “Best Practices” for Effective Communication

On Friday at 1215 in the EpiCenter, social media experts from across the globe will gather to discuss best practices for social media communication and engagement. Experts such as Jared Bunch, MD and Leslie Saxon will share personal experiences and relate case studies of how social media and digital engagement have empowered their patients, improved their practices, and resulted in technological breakthroughs.

3.Applying Digital Health Technology to Engage Patients and Consumers to Better Health.

Mobile technologies are continuing to emerge at a dizzying pace. Fitness trackers, mobile EKG monitors, and even “wearables” are changing the way we interact with our patients — giving both provider and patient a wealth of data. In this session, digital technology experts will demonstrate their latest technologies, share research, and discuss ways in which mobile health (m-Health tools) will impact the practice of medicine in the future.

4.Mainstream Media 101

Healthcare topics appear on mainstream news outlets every single day. Unfortunately, the quality of the information and the qualifications and reliability of those reporting health care news is often called into question. Healthcare providers receive little or no formal media training (unless they are in positions of leadership in societies, medical board, hospital boards, or government agencies such as the FDA) during their years of medical education. In an effort to better prepare our members for media interaction, I, along with several of my colleagues on the HRS Communications committee, will be conducting a Media Training session on Friday May 6th at 12:15pm.

HRS 2016 has gotten off to a fast start; engagement has been terrific and more members are joining the discussion.

The digital presence at academic meetings such as this one serve to enhance learning and promotes better communication and fosters new relationships among attendees.

Ultimately, a digital presence will impact the care for our patients by improving awareness, increasing access and promoting collaboration among healthcare professionals.