Lawrence Eichenfield, MD: Phase 3 Trial Data on Ruxolitinib for Atopic Dermatitis

During his HCPLive interview, Dr. Eichenfield described the results from the phase 3 TRuE-AD trials testing ruxolitinib for atopic dermatitis, including how the findings might affect treatment for vitiligo or psoriasis.

In an interview with HCPLive, Lawrence Eichenfield, MD, spoke about the recent phase 3 TRuE-AD trial data on the use of ruxolitinib monotherapy for atopic dermatitis (AD).

Dr. Eichenfield serves as chief of pediatric and adolescent dermatology at Rady Children's Hospital-San Diego. He also works as a professor of dermatology and pediatrics, as well as the vice-chair of the department of dermatology at UC San Diego School of Medicine.

Eichenfield described some of the major takeaways from the phase 3 TRuE-AD trials on ruxolitinib for AD.

“I think that, first of all, the takeaway is that the drug was effective and stayed effective,” Eichenfield said. “That's probably number 1. And number 2 is that in the extended use, there was nothing that showed that the extended use created different safety issues than what was seen in that carefully controlled eight week time period.”

The trial resulted in achievement of disease control being sustained over the course of 52 weeks while using ruxolitinib cream 1.5%. The results also indicated that there was a rise in the proportion of AD patients with no or minimal skin lesions over 52 weeks, and the mean affected body surface area (BSA) decreased by Week 52.

“Number 2 is that in the extended use, there was nothing that showed that the extended use created different safety issues than what was seen in that carefully controlled 8-week time period,” he said. “So first of all, it's like that long term stamp of approval. Because that's it you know, this is the first JAK inhibitor approved for atopic dermatitis. It happens to be topical, but it was the first JAK inhibitor.”

When asked about what the trial data could mean in terms of psoriasis and vitiligo treatment in the future, Eichenfield explained his views on the connection.

“Now, it's getting crowded in psoriasis right now, because there are 2 nonsteroidals that have been approved for psoriasis since ruxolitinib,” he said. “But forget psoriasis, look at vitiligo. So in the meantime, since topical rux was approved for atopic dermatitis, it got approved for vitiligo as the first ever, you know, approved medication for vitiligo.”

Eichenfield also added that in the future, he hopes research into ruxolitinib will expand to pediatric patients with conditions like AD.

For more information on the recent trial data, view the full interview with Dr. Eichenfield above.

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