MRSA Infection Rates Drop Dramatically

August 13, 2010

The rate of hospital-onset MRSA fell 9.4% each year between 2005 and 2008, representing a total decrease of 28%, according to a report published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The rate of hospital-onset MRSA fell 9.4% each year between 2005 and 2008, representing a total decrease of 28%, according to a report published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

In an effort to determine whether MRSA prevention programs are affecting changes in infection incidence, Alexander J. Kallen, MD, MPH, and colleagues for the Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs) MRSA Investigators of the CDC’s Emerging Infections Program conducted surveillance for invasive MRSA in nine metropolitan areas covering a population of approximately 15 million people.

The investigators evaluated all reports of laboratory-identified episodes of invasive MRSA infections from 2005 through 2008 based on the setting of the positive culture and the presence or absence of healthcare exposures. The analysis included hospital-onset and health care—associated community-onset infections.

Of the 21,503 episodes of invasive MRSA infection, 17,508 were determined to be healthcare-associated. The incidence rate of hospital-onset invasive MRSA infections was 1.02 per 10,000 population in 2005 and decreased 9.4% per year, and the incidence of healthcare-associated community-onset infections was 2.20 per 10,000 population in 2005, representing a decrease of 5.7% per year.

Based on these findings, the researchers believe that falling MRSA rates may be attributed to prevention efforts.