Psoriasis Survey Reveals 85% of Patients Face Social Stigma and Discrimination

Novartis conducted a global survey of 8,338 patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis across 31 countries to assess patients’ perceptions of what constitutes “clear skin.â€

Novartis conducted a global survey of 8,338 patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis across 31 countries to assess patients’ perceptions of what constitutes “clear skin.”

The results revealed that 84% of participants face discrimination and humiliation, while 40% often suffer being stared at in silence.

The survey also showed that approximately 45% of people with psoriasis have been asked whether they were contagious.

The social stigma associated with this skin condition has had devastating effects on the patients’ personal lives and mental health — nearly 16% of survey participants confessed to leading reclusive lives as their coping mechanism.

Even more unfortunate, psoriasis patients have very low treatment expectations of achieving variations of clear skin.

According to Richard B. Warren, MD, dermatology Centre Salford Royal Foundation Hospital, University of Manchester, the goal is searching for effective treatment. “Though we may not be able to change the public’s attitude overnight, as dermatologists, we should work with patients to encourage them to strive towards a treatment goal of clean skin.”

In hopes of improving patients’ lives, Vasant Narasimham, MD, Global Head, Drug Development and Chief Medical Officer, said, “This survey marks our commitment to support the World Health Organization’s (WHO) resolution to make psoriasis a global health priority, fighting the stigma and ignorance associated with psoriasis and advancing patient care.”