Todd Hobbs, MD: Positive Results of Once-Weekly Insulin Icodec Vs Glargine

June 17, 2020

Todd Hobbs, MD, breaks down research presented at ADA 2020.

Todd Hobbs, MD

Patients with type 2 diabetes who took once-weekly insulin icodec achieve similar blood sugar control and a similar safety profile compared to those with the condition who took once-daily insulin glargine U100.

The results of the study were presented as part of the American Diabetes Association’s (ADA’s) 80th Virtual Scientific Sessions.

A team of investigators enrolled 247 insulin-naïve adults with type 2 diabetes in the 26-week, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, treat-to-target phase 2 clinical trial. The patients’ diabetes was inadequately controlled with metformin with or without DPP-4i.

The primary measure demonstrated the change from baseline to week 26 in blood sugar control was similar in those who received once-weekly insulin icodec compared to once-daily insulin glargine U100 (-1.33 vs -1.15 percentage points; P=.08). Additional endpoints were change in fasting plasma glucose from baseline to week 26 and the change from baseline to week 26 of the nine-point self-monitoring of blood glucose profile.

The change in fasting plasma glucose was similar from baseline to week 26 for insulin icodec and insulin glargine U100 (-58mg/dL and -54mg/dL). The change of the mean of the nine-point self-monitoring of blood glucose profile was greater for icodec (-7.9 mg/dL; P=.01).

Hyperglycemia was similar for both groups (observed rates of level 2 [<54 mg/dL] and 3 [severe] hypoglycemia were 52.5 and 45.6 events per 100 patient-years of exposure for insulin icodec and insulin glargine U100). There was a similar proportion of patients who had an adverse event among both groups.

Glargine was chosen because it’s the most used branded basal insulin in the world and particularly in the US.

The efficacy and safety were very encouraging, Todd Hobbs, MD, chief medical officer of Novo Nordisk, said in an interview with HCPLive®.

“We were very encouraged that the overnight glucose was very stable and that we didn’t see any change or increases in hypoglycemia versus glargine, so very encouraging results,” Hobbs said.

To learn more about the study and the key findings, check out part of the interview with Hobbs below.