VIDEO: Worldwide SHIFT Study Trumps Predecessors on Link Between Heart Rate, Heart Failure Success

Jeffrey S. Borer, MD, of the Howard Gilman Institute for Heart Valve Disease, discusses the SHIFT study's value for cardiologists over various recent heart failure trials.

Though “many, many, many” studies have established a link between heart rate and heart failure outcomes, Jeffrey S. Borer, MD, of the Howard Gilman Institute for Heart Valve Disease, says the international SHIFT study — which launched in 2006 and first presented results at the 2010 European Society of Cardiology Congress — has offered the most useful information on the benefit of modulating heart rate to modulate heart failure outcomes.

“There are other recent studies that have been performed, but none has provided anything like the mass of data that came from SHIFT,” Borer says, noting the study significantly outsized previous randomized clinical trials on heart failure by enlisting a total of 6,505 patients worldwide.

While Borer says the association between heart rate and heart failure outcomes has been “demonstrated in many epidemiological studies over many years,” he says SHIFT’s main and ancillary results have addressed the “benefit of modulating the heart rate to modulate the outcome” to the greatest degree, which has “provided a tremendous amount of information for (doctors) that we didn’t have.”

SHIFT Abstract