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Flash Findings: Cancer Facts

OBTN, October 2007, Volume 1, Issue 8

A collection of cancer statistics and facts

Click here to view as PDF.

â–º Mortality

• This year, 559,650 Americans are projected to die of cancer, perishing at a daily rate of approximately 1,500.

Source: American Cancer Society

• Cancer is considered to be the second-largest reason for death in the U.S. after heart disease, with roughly one in

every four deaths linked to some form of cancer.

Source: American Cancer Society

• About seven million people die of cancer each year worldwide. If current trends continue, by 2020 more than 10

million people could die from the disease.

Source: International Union Against Cancer

• The developing world will bear the brunt of increased cancer fatality rates. By 2020, three quarters of cancer deaths

will occur in the developing world.

Source: International Union Against Cancer

â–º Incidence

• The annual incidence of cancer is expected to increase about 50% to 15 million cases annually by 2020.

Source: World Health Organization

â–º Breast Cancer

• An estimated 178,500 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to occur among women in the U.S. in 2007.

in situ

• Roughly 62,000 cases of non-invasive () breast cancer are expected to occur among women in 2007.

• After decades of annual increases, breast cancer incidence has leveled off over the past several years.

• Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women.

• Roughly 2,030 cases of new male breast cancer are expected in 2007.

Source: American Cancer Society

â–º Cancer Costs

• In 2006, the overall costs of cancer were $206.3 billion.

• Direct medical cancer costs (total health expenditures) exceeded $78.2 billion.

Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH)

• Cancer Costs $17.9 billion in indirect morbidity (costs of lost productivity due to illness) and $110.2 billion in indirect

mortality (costs of lost productivity due to premature death).

Source: American Cancer Society

â–º Smoking and Cancer

• Smoking is the main cause of cancer in the world and the main cause of death in adult life.

• Annually, about one million people in the United States take up smoking. Worldwide, roughly 30 million people

begin smoking each year.

Source: Deathfromsmoking.net

All cancers caused by cigarette smoking could be prevented completely. • It is estimated that in 2007, 168,000

cancer fatalities are expected to be caused by smoking.

Source: American Cancer Society

Smoking and Cancer

Chances of lung cancer in men who stop smoking at age 50

6%

Chances of lung cancer in men who continue to smoke past age 50

16%

Chances of cancer of the pharynx, esophagus, and larynx in men who stop smoking at age 50

3%

Chances of cancer of the pharynx, esophagus, and larynx in men who continue to smoke past age 50

6.4%

Sources: British Medical Journal and the American Journal of Epidemiology

â–º Cancer and Minorities

The death rate from cancer among African-American males is 38% higher than the death rate of Caucasians.

• The death rate from cancer among African-American females is 17% higher than the death rate of Caucasians.

Source: American Cancer Society

â–º Oncology Marketplace

Over the next several years, the global cancer market is predicted to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR)

exceeding 10%.

Source: Datamonitor

The global market for cancer innovatives has more than tripled in size over the last four years, achieving a CAGR of

33.1% between 2003 and 2006.

• Monoclonal antibodies comprised four of the top ten leading cancer innovatives in 2006, supplemented by novel

chemotherapeutics, hormonals, and targeted therapies.

• According to experts, 10 blockbuster drugs are likely to emerge in cancer therapy over the next decade as recent and

impending scientific breakthroughs continue to enhance treatment options

• Genentech and Roche continue to command a substantial proportion of the cancer innovatives market, generating

almost 50% of all sales in 2006.

Source: Globalbusinessinsights.com

â–º Prostate Cancer

One in six men will get prostate cancer during his lifetime, but only one in 34 will die of the disease.

Source: American Cancer Society

â–º Testicular Cancer

There are nearly 140,000 men in the United States who have survived testicular cancer.

• There will be roughly 7,920 new cases in the United States and 380 deaths from the disease in 2007.

Source: American Cancer Society

â–º BioFact

In 1882, German biologist Walter Fleming discovered chromatin; rod-like structures inside the cell nucleus that later

came to be called chromosomes.