Food Allergies and Apple Fudge

This week, a new report suggests that many people who think they have a food allergy actually don't, and Apple doctors its iPhone sales figures.

We really don’t know how many Americans truly have food allergies, according to a study in the latest issue of JAMA. The research, which is a part of a larger project of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, suggests that due to a lack of uniformity in diagnostic criteria, there are many people who think that they have a food allergy when they actually don’t.

I haven’t read through the entire report, but I’m encouraged that there is a difference being drawn between immune system reactions and intolerances that can emerge from a multitude of other sources. Additionally, I was surprised by how much we don’t know to date about the effectiveness of food allergy management methods we employ.

On the technology front, the release of the iPad has predictably been closely followed by an Apple smack-down. While history suggests that Steve Jobs and his company will survive quite nicely, the battle lines that Apple has drawn may in the short term bite the company in the phone and tablet markets. Apple is evidently already feeling a little sting, as it was caught earlier this week fudging its sales data.

Have you seen the new HTC Incredible Android phone marketed by Verizon? I checked it out, and it’s a thing of beauty. Read the Digital Trends HTC vs. iPhone comparison here.

Just a reminder, there’s still time to sign up for the Physician's Computer Company (PCC) 2010 Pediatric Coding and Practice Management Conference being held in Vermont this July. If you are thinking about implementing an EHR system or want to improve your coding practices, take a look at the course descriptions to see if the offerings meet your needs.