Factors Associated with Improved Outcome after Surgery in Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients

Article

This study evaluated the difference in outcome in patients with metastatic breast cancer after mastectomy versus breast conservation and factors that influence outcome.

Journal: American Journal of Surgery (October 2009)

Authors: McGuire KP, Eisen S, Meade T, et al.

Purpose: Studies suggest local surgical therapy improves survival in metastatic breast cancer. In this study, the authors evaluated the difference in outcome in patients with metastatic breast cancer after mastectomy versus breast conservation and factors that influence outcome.

Results: The study included 566 patients with metastatic breast cancer. Of these patients, 154 (27%) had the primary tumor removed. Surgery was associated with an improved overall survival rate (33%) versus no surgery (20%). Of those undergoing local therapy, mastectomy was associated with a 37% overall survival versus breast conservation with a 20% overall survival. The authors concluded that removal of the primary tumor in metastatic breast cancer is associated with improved overall survival, and that mastectomy results in a significantly improved overall survival.

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