MS Patients at Risk of Lung Disease

Chronic lung disease (CLD) is more prevalent among people with multiple sclerosis (MS) than the general population,

Chronic lung disease (CLD) is more prevalent among people with multiple sclerosis (MS) than the general population,

A recent study documenting the finding was conducted by Ruth Ann Marrie, MD, PhD, of the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, and colleagues, and

A recent study found that chronic lung disease (CLD) is more prevalent among people with multiple sclerosis (MS) than the general population. The study, conducted by Ruth Ann Marrie, MD, PhD, of the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, and colleagues, appeared in the journal Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders on May 11. 2016.

The aim of this study was to “estimate the incidence and prevalence of chronic lung disease (CLD), including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, in the MS population versus a matched cohort from the general population,” said the researchers. In order to investigate, they used administrative data from four Canadian provinces to identify and match MS patients and controls.

There were 44,452 MS patients who were age, sex, and geographically matched to 220,849 controls in this study. The researchers found that the crude incidence of CLD among MS patients was 806 per 100,000 in 2005, while it was 757 per 100,000 in the general population. However, the researchers go on to report that when they looked at the age-specific annual rates, they found some differences. “Specifically, among persons aged 20-44 years, the average annual incidence of CLD was 15% higher in the MS population,” they said. That difference was not true for people aged 45-49 years, or for those older than 60.

Previous studies had produced inconsistent results. This one, using data for 265,301 people, over a 10-year period, allowed for a more detailed look at CLD and MS. The researchers say, “While initial analyses suggested that the incidence and prevalence of CLD did not differ between populations, we identified potentially important differences in these associations by age group which may account for some of the inconsistencies in the literature.”

Interestingly, the researchers found that the incidence of CLD was stable in both the MS and general population over the 10-year period, but, they said “the prevalence of CLD increased 60% over the study period for both populations.” This finding suggests that people are living longer with CLD. The researchers note that “attention to the possible presence of CLD in relatively younger age cohorts with MS is warranted as modification of this underlying comorbidity may benefit MS outcomes.”

The aim of this study was to “estimate the incidence and prevalence of chronic lung disease (CLD), including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, in the MS population versus a matched cohort from the general population,” said the researchers. In order to investigate, they used administrative data from four Canadian provinces to identify and match MS patients and controls.

There were 44,452 MS patients who were age, sex, and geographically matched to 220,849 controls in this study. The researchers found that the crude incidence of CLD among MS patients was 806 per 100,000 in 2005, while it was 757 per 100,000 in the general population. However, the researchers go on to report that when they looked at the age-specific annual rates, they found some differences. “Specifically, among persons aged 20-44 years, the average annual incidence of CLD was 15% higher in the MS population,” they said. That difference was not true for people aged 45-49 years, or for those older than 60.

Previous studies had produced inconsistent results. This one, using data for 265,301 people, over a 10-year period, allowed for a more detailed look at CLD and MS. The researchers say, “While initial analyses suggested that the incidence and prevalence of CLD did not differ between populations, we identified potentially important differences in these associations by age group which may account for some of the inconsistencies in the literature.”

Interestingly, the researchers found that the incidence of CLD was stable in both the MS and general population over the 10-year period, but, they said “the prevalence of CLD increased 60% over the study period for both populations.” This finding suggests that people are living longer with CLD. The researchers note that “attention to the possible presence of CLD in relatively younger age cohorts with MS is warranted as modification of this underlying comorbidity may benefit MS outcomes.”

The aim of this study was to “estimate the incidence and prevalence of chronic lung disease (CLD), including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, in the MS population versus a matched cohort from the general population,” said the researchers. In order to investigate, they used administrative data from four Canadian provinces to identify and match MS patients and controls.

There were 44,452 MS patients who were age, sex, and geographically matched to 220,849 controls in this study. The researchers found that the crude incidence of CLD among MS patients was 806 per 100,000 in 2005, while it was 757 per 100,000 in the general population. However, the researchers go on to report that when they looked at the age-specific annual rates, they found some differences. “Specifically, among persons aged 20-44 years, the average annual incidence of CLD was 15% higher in the MS population,” they said. That difference was not true for people aged 45-49 years, or for those older than 60.

Previous studies had produced inconsistent results. This one, using data for 265,301 people, over a 10-year period, allowed for a more detailed look at CLD and MS. The researchers say, “While initial analyses suggested that the incidence and prevalence of CLD did not differ between populations, we identified potentially important differences in these associations by age group which may account for some of the inconsistencies in the literature.”

Interestingly, the researchers found that the incidence of CLD was stable in both the MS and general population over the 10-year period, but, they said “the prevalence of CLD increased 60% over the study period for both populations.” This finding suggests that people are living longer with CLD. The researchers note that “attention to the possible presence of CLD in relatively younger age cohorts with MS is warranted as modification of this underlying comorbidity may benefit MS outcomes.”