Do You Hear the Pitter-Patter of New Pediatric Medical Devices?

December 3, 2008

It's been more than a year since we passed the Pediatric Medical Device Safety and Improvement Act. There is an argument that movement will be slow due to market factors and I have to admit that I haven't seen a lot of new technology.

It’s been more than a year since we passed thePediatric Medical Device Safety and Improvement Act. There is an argument that movement will be slow due to market factors and I have to admit that I haven’t seen a lot of new technology. Is this just another example of how the health of US children is tied to profitability? How do you think we’re doing?

The top news in children’s health in mainstream media this week is the negative effects of TV, video games, etc. I hope this doesn’t leave anyone in the general public scratching their head. Maybe instead of putting the kibosh on fast food advertisements, it’s too bad that we can’t just flip the switch altogether.

If your office holds prenatal classes for expectant parents, you might get some questions in the near future about folic acid supplements. There’s a study out of Norway in Archives of Disease in Childhood that found how folate supplements taken during the first trimester of pregnancy are associated with increased risk of wheezing and respiratory tract infections in infants up to 18 months old. Cesarean section also appears to increase the risk of asthma, giving expectant mothers a “double whammy.”

And, speaking of your office, the US Consumer Safety Commission has published a poster advising parents shopping for Christmas toys. If anyone asks, here are the long lists of recalls for toys and other children’s products. Lead is affecting products sold all over the place — even sleeping bags and fairy wands sold at Disney stores. The origin of these products? China, China, China, Ch—oops, Hong Kong, China, China, and China. Lead paint and melamine in milk. Those eight FDA staffers didn’t get to Beijing a minute too soon did they?