Sophie J. Bakri, MD: The Substantial Burden of Geographic Atrophy

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At ASRS 2023, results from the MOSAIC study indicate the substantial burden of geographic atrophy on patients and their caregivers across the United States and Canada.

Sophie J. Bakri, MD | Image Credit: Mayo Clinic

Sophie J. Bakri, MD

Credit: Mayo Clinic

New results from the MOSAIC study suggest the substantial burden of geographic atrophy (GA) on both patients with GA and their caregivers across the United States and Canada.

The data, presented at the American Society of Retina Specialists (ASRS) 41st Annual Scientific Meeting, showed patients reported the inability to drive, needing daily help, and a change in their living citation due to GA.

“In addition, you know, there's an impact on mental health, patients reported frustration, worry about their vision, and inability to control their finances, and just a general sort of lack of control over their life,” presenting investigator Sophie J. Bakri, MD, chair and professor of ophthalmology at Mayo Clinic, told HCPLive at ASRS 2023.

Bakri and the investigative team aimed to uncover the extent to which the burden of GA in patients and caregivers is different across the US and Canada. The team performed a survey in both countries with 149 patients with GA, including 102 in the US and 47 in Canada, as well as 148 unpaid caregivers of patients with GA, including 102 in the US and 46 in Canada.

Upon analysis, investigators found a higher proportion of male patients in Canada than in the US (62% vs. 43%), with a lower mean age in the US at 68 years compared with Canada at 73 years. Most patients were retired: 77% in the US and 81% in Canada. The mean time from diagnosis of GA was 6.3 and 5.3 years in the US and Canada, respectively.

Data showed visual changes from GA were reported in both eyes by 43% of patients in the US and 47% of patients in Canada. Additionally, patients reported receiving help from children (41% in the US; 34% in Canada), partners (39% in the US; 47% in Canada), and/or other family members (39% in the US; 32% in Canada). Investigators noted the mean 39-item National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ-39) composite scores were comparable in both countries (44.6 in the US; 48.3 in Canada), suggesting similar vision-related quality of life.

In addition, more US patients reported needing daily help (68%) or a change in their living situation due to GA (38%) than patients in Canada (38% and 28%, respectively). Overall, 86% of patients in the US and 72% of patients in Canada did not drive. Specifically, 85% and 97% of non-drivers gave up driving due to eyesight in the US and Canada, respectively.

There was a higher proportion of male caregivers in Canada than in the US (61% vs. 47%) and the mean age was similar in both countries (46 in the US; 44 in Canada). In the US, caregivers mostly reported caring for their partner (37%) or a parent (30%), as opposed to Canada, where caregivers mostly reported caring for their parent (65%) or a grandparent (26%).

Overall, the analysis reported 63% of caregivers in Canada were categorized as having moderate to severe burden versus only 15% of US caregivers. The data showed 44% and 93% of US and Canadian caregivers were employed, respectively. Time missed from work in the previous week due to caregiver responsibilities was similar (mean, 3 days in the US and 3 hours in Canada).

In the analysis, US dyad data (n = 93) indicated the burden of patients and caregivers was moderately related, with a correlation of –0.63 between NEI-VFQ-39 composite score and Zarit Burden Interview scores.

For more insight into this analysis, watch the full interview with Dr. Bakri below:

Relevant disclosures for Dr. Bakri include Abbvie, Apellis, Genentench, Iveric Bio, Novartis, and Roche.

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