The Watson Scaphoid Shift Test

In this test, the patient’s forearm is placed in pronation. The examiner places pressure on the volar distal pole of the scaphoid and the dorsal lip of the radius, and moves the wrist from ulnar toradial deviation.

In this test, the patient’s forearm is placed in pronation. The examiner places pressure on the volar distal pole of the scaphoid and the dorsal lip of the radius, and moves the wrist from ulnar to
radial deviation.

A painful “clunk” with radial deviation and reproduction of the patient’s pain are considered positive test results. A a clunk is not necessary for the result to be considered positive.

Also, the test may not be accurate in an acute setting or in the presence of other injuries, such as a distal
radial fracture.

Numerous videos of the scaphoid shift test are posted on YouTube.

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