What We Learned About HIV in 2015

December 15, 2015
Caitlyn Fitzpatrick

This was a pivotal year in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) research, including treatment revelations and a confirmed celebrity diagnosis.

This was a pivotal year in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) research, including treatment revelations and a confirmed celebrity diagnosis.

Positive steps have been made over the past 12 months in terms of better managing HIV and uncovering its pathology. Cholesterol and vitamin D proved to be influential in infected patients and key discoveries were made about elite controllers, or patients who have an undetectable viral load without antiretroviral therapy.

In the beginning of the year at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2015), emphasis was put on the need to optimize HIV prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. The top articles featured by MD Magazine hit on those very points.

Read on to catch up on the key HIV findings over the past year, and stay up-to-date with the MD Magazine HIV/AIDS condition center.

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Why Did This HIV Vaccine Candidate Fail?

Although a vaccine induced antibodies specific to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), it failed to protect against the infection.

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Preventive HIV Drug Shows 100% Efficacy

The HIV preventive drug combo marketed by Gilead as Truvada has apparently been completely effective in a large clinical practice setting, Kaiser-Permanente announced September 2.

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Matchstick-Size Implant Prevents and Treats HIV

A significant improvement in human immunodeficency virus (HIV) prevention and survival rates could be on the horizon due to revolutionary device.

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Charlie Sheen Reveals He's HIV-Positive, But His Doctor Says It Won't Kill Him

Former Two and a Half Men star Charlie Sheen divulged on the TODAY show that he is infected with HIV (human immunodeficiency virus). And while it can impact everyday life, it is not the be-all and end-all disease that it once was in the 80's.

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Most Up-to-Date HIV Infections Per Household Estimate in the US

About 50,000 people become infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) every year in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The latest data from the CDC offers valuable insight into current trends in HIV infection.

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HIV Accelerates Patients' Risk for Illness by 14 Years

Age by itself is associated with a higher risk for some diseases. However, patients with HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) have an even greater risk of developing certain illnesses at an earlier age.

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HIV Drug Scores Home Run in Phase III Study for Women

While any new research on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is welcome, the majority has been focused on men. Researchers have found that the sexes feel pain differently, so the fact that gender-specific studies have been lacking for women only inhibits progress. However, the first trial of its kind used all women to assess the efficacy of an HIV medication.

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4-Year HIV Antiretroviral Study Ends with Clear-Cut Results

The first large-scale clinical trial of its kind has confirmed big news when it comes to treatment for patients with the human immunodeficency virus (HIV).

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Your Zip Code Could Influence HIV Outcomes

By using "big data," a research team from the University of Chicago and other institutions tried to find out if it is true that lack of trained infectious disease physicians is associated with geographic disparities in how well patients with HIV/AIDS fare.

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Continued Semen Exposure May Amp Up HIV Resistance

It's well-known that unprotected sex increases your chances of contracting the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted diseases, but a surprising study involving sex workers found that continued semen exposure may actually help the body build up resistance.

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Bad News: HIV Can Still Grow Regardless of Treatment

The human immunodeficency virus (HIV) has proven to be increasingly stubborn as a new study reported that even treatment may not slow down its replication.

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Using a Herpes Medication to Combat HIV Activity

A herpes medication can reduce human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) levels no matter a patient's herpes status, according to research published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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FDA Releases Final Guidance for HIV Treatment

The first final guidance in over 13 years for the development of new antiretroviral drugs for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been released by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

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