The American Lung Association will Publish 2023 "State of the Air" Report Next Week

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Often referred to as an air quality “report card”, the annual collection of data reflects the amount of air pollution individuals are exposed to, including unhealthy levels of ozone and particle pollution.

The American Lung Association will Publish 2023 "State of the Air" Report Next Week

Credit: Twitter, American Lung Association

The American Lung Association announced that Wednesday, April 19 will be the release date of its 24th annual “State of the Air” report. This year’s report will reveal the air quality changes since last year, referencing county and metro areas.1

The impact of air pollution on the population’s health and how many people are within the vicinity of polluted air will be explained, along with the grade of local air quality, ranking the most and least affected cities in the US.

Often referred to as an air quality “report card”, the annual collection of data reflects the amount of air pollution individuals are exposed to, including unhealthy levels of ozone and particle pollution.

According to the statement, the report’s findings are essential for individuals, communities, and policymakers to take appropriate actions to reduce air pollution and improve public health. It will also suggest what actions residents and local, state, and national leaders can take to promote air quality.

Air Quality: A Public Health Concern

Air pollution is a significant public health issue in the US, which can lead to various health problems, including respiratory illnesses such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), heart disease, stroke, and lung cancer, the American Lung Association stated.

New research is published regularly addressing the multifaceted impact low quality air has on health. Recent findings identified a link between air pollution and vulnerability to persistent COVID-19 symptoms or long COVID.2

Another investigation demonstrated that air pollutants are significantly associated with reduced bone mineral density among postmenopausal women.3

Predictably, diminished pulmonary function was observed in children with asthma in areas with high particulate matter and ozone concentrations4, but the ambient effect of pollutants extends to mental health as well.

A 10-year study found older adults with long-term exposure to air pollution had an increased risk of late-onset depression.5

The "State of the Air" annual report aims to raise awareness of the negative impact of air pollution on public health and motivate actions to enhance air quality.

References:

  1. American Lung Association
  2. Grossi G. Risk of Long COVID Increases with Air Pollution. HCPLive. March 31, 2023. https://www.hcplive.com/view/risk-of-long-covid-increases-air-pollution
  3. Grossi G. Study Reveals Striking Link Between Air Pollution and Bone Damage. HCPLive. February 21, 2023. https://www.hcplive.com/view/study-reveals-striking-link-between-air-pollution-and-bone-damage
  4. Smith T. Asthma Associated with Greater Air Particulate Matter, Ozone in Urbanized Areas. HCPLive. February 9, 2023. https://www.hcplive.com/view/asthma-associated-greater-air-particulate-matter-ozone-urbanized-areas
  5. Smith T. Association Identified Between Depression Risk, Long-Term Air Pollution for Older Adults. HCPLive. February 15, 2023. https://www.hcplive.com/view/association-between-depression-risk-long-term-air-pollution-older-adults
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