Traditional Systemic Therapy for Psoriasis for Patients With Skin of Color

Opinion
Video

Drs Desai, Shahriari, and Stein Gold examine use and place of traditional systemic treatments in psoriasis.

This is a video synopsis/summary of a panel discussion involving Linda Stein Gold, MD; Mona Shahriari, MD, FAAD; and Seemal Desai, MD.

The conversation revolves around the use of systemic agents in the treatment of psoriasis, with a focus on the shift away from traditional options like methotrexate towards newer, safer alternatives. While systemic therapy remains crucial, especially for patients with comorbidities, there is a consensus among the speakers that newer generation medications offer better efficacy and safety profiles.

The reluctance to use traditional systemic agents like methotrexate stems from concerns about safety, including the need for monitoring liver function tests and potential long-term complications. Instead, dermatologists are increasingly turning to biologics and newer oral agents, which offer faster onset of action and fewer side effects.

Discussion also touches on the historical practice of combining biologics with methotrexate to maintain efficacy over time. However, with the availability of more effective biologics and oral agents, this practice is becoming less common, with dermatologists preferring to stack newer oral agents onto biologics if additional therapy is needed.

Overall, the conversation underscores the importance of staying updated with evolving treatment options for psoriasis, prioritizing both efficacy and safety in patient care.

Video synopsis is AI-generated and reviewed by HCPLive editorial staff.

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