Q&A With Claresa Levetan From Chestnut Hill Hospital: Diabetes Care Past Present and Future

A considerable amount of progress has been made in treating diabetes this year both for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The approval of new medications and potential devices in the future have made for a bright outlook for patients.

A considerable amount of progress has been made in treating diabetes this year both for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The approval of new medications and potential devices in the future have made for a bright outlook for patients.

Claresa Levetan, MD, FACE, from Chestnut Hill Hospital discussed the work that has been done in the field during the 24th Annual AACE Scientific and Clinical Congress in Nashville. Levetan said the addition of new insulins on the market, including an inhaler form have made this an exciting time in the industry. The prospect of an artificial pancreas shows potential for future treatments being developed as well.

Learn more about the difficult choices doctors make when choosing treamtent options in part 2.

With so many medications on the market for the treatment of diabetes it can be difficult for doctors to find the right one for the individual patient. When cost is a factor in the decision making it can complicate treatment even further.

Levetan said that as the cost of insulin continues to grow it makes it less affordable for patients trying to make ends meet beyond their medical needs. The use of samples and older medications are two options which she said can help get patients the help they so badly need.

Learn more about the benefits of prevention in the overall treatment of diabetes in part 3.

The number of cases of diabetes continues to grow but there is plenty that can be done to keep that number from growing exponentially higher. Both doctors and patients can play a role in the process.

Levetan noted that testing has improved dramatically for prediabetes which can help patients and their doctors make the changes needed to avoid developing into full diabetes. "If you can intervene prior to diabetes you can reduce your risk for developing diabetes dramatically," she said.